Election update

The April 11, 2019, Spring Hill Municipal Election is just around the corner, so don’t forget to register to vote!

If you voted in the last election, then you are already registered to vote. If you’re not sure if you’re still registered and eligible to vote in the upcoming election, you can find out here. Today is the last day to register to vote in the April 2019 City Election.

You can easily register online at https://sos.tn.gov/products/elections/register-vote, or complete a voter registration paper form and mail it to the Maury County Election Commission.

Early voting will be available March 22 through April 6, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays, and 8 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, at Winchester Community Center, 563 Maury Hill St., in Spring Hill.

The Board of Mayor & Aldermen is made up of an elected mayor and eight elected aldermen represented by four city wards. The four wards are each represented by two aldermen. The upcoming election will include one of each of the four ward alderman seats on the ballot, as alderman elections are staggered every two years. Though aldermen are elected in each of their respective wards, voters will have the opportunity to vote for the candidate of their choice in all four wards.

These are the citizens who met the Jan. 17, 2019, candidate qualifying requirements for the four available alderman seats, and will appear on the April 11 election ballot (listed in alphabetical order):

WARD 1: John Canepari, Liz Droke, Alex Jimenez and Bryan Watt
The Ward 1 seat was vacated in December 2018 by former Alderman Chad Whittenburg, who resigned from the position after moving outside Spring Hill city limits. The BOMA on Jan. 22, 2019, temporarily appointed Clint McCain to serve in the Ward 1 Alderman seat until voters elect a replacement to the position in April.

WARD 2: Matt Fitterer (Incumbent Alderman)

WARD 3: Daniel Allen, and Susan Zemek (Incumbent Alderman)

WARD 4: Doug Holtz and Hazel Nieves

Incumbent Ward 4 Alderman/Vice Mayor Bruce Hull, who has served 12 years on the BOMA, is not seeking re-election.

For more election details, please visit our City Election 2019 page, or the Maury County Election Commission, which administers the Spring Hill Election.

POLITICAL SIGNS

These are the general rules that political candidates and citizens should follow when placing political campaign signs on their property, according to city ordinance:

 

  • Are limited to 16 square feet in area
  • Must be a minimum of 5 feet from any lot line and may not be installed in a manner that obstructs visibility of intersections
  • Must have permission of the property owner to post on private property
  • Cannot be illuminated
  • May be installed no sooner than 60 days prior to the election and must be removed within 48 hours of such event or activity
  • Cannot be placed on public property, including the right-of-way
  • No sign may be erected in a manner that obstructs access to any ingress or egress, fire escapes, fire hydrants, fire department connections, or standpipes and similar fire safety connections
  • No sign may be installed in a manner that obstructs stormwater flow for the stormwater system serving that lot

 

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