The latest in a long line of Eagle Scouts for Franklin Troop #137 received Scouting’s highest rank recently.  Samuel Ethan Burford, son of Craig and De’Anne Burford of Franklin, was recently awarded his rank at a Court of Honor.  More than 170 boys have achieved the Eagle rank since Scoutmaster John Green first launched the troop in 1975.

Allen Henry, left, and Harry Dugan, right, both leaders within Boy Scout Troop #137 surround Sam Burford following his Board of Review, the last test before the Eagle rank is granted.
Allen Henry, left, and Harry Dugan, right, both leaders within Boy Scout Troop #137 surround Sam Burford following his Board of Review, the last test before the Eagle rank is granted.

While in high school, Sam was a squad leader in the Centennial High School JROTC and achieved 56 badges on his way to Eagle. His Eagle Scout project was to build/refurbish several picnic tables at the James W & Mary C. Short Park for Seniors in downtown Franklin (Part of the J. L. Clay Senior Citizen Center in Franklin) and rebuild a concrete ramp to a restroom at the park to make the facility more wheelchair accessible. He is 18-years-old and recently graduated from Centennial High School. He is bound for The University of Tennessee Knoxville this fall to study architecture. His Eagle Scout Court of Honor where he was awarded his Eagle badge was Saturday, August 8, 2015

Eagle is the highest rank in Scouting, an honor that only about 5 percent of all Boy Scouts ever attain. Only 1.7 million Scouts have earned the rank since 1910, when Scouting began in the U.S. Troop #137 makes a concerted effort to encourage all of its Scouts towards this achievement.

To earn the Eagle Scout rank, a Boy Scout must fulfill requirements in leadership, service and outdoor skills and must advance through the ranks— Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle, passing specific tests organized by requirements and merit badges. Eagle candidates must earn 21 merit badges, demonstrate proficiency in increasingly more responsible community service and direct an Eagle project that benefits the community.

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