Fairview to Host Storm Spotter Class

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The City of Fairview will host a SKYWARN Storm Spotter class put on by National Weather Service.

This class is scheduled for Tuesday, March 24 beginning at 6pm at city hall. Classes are free, for all ages and will last approximately two hours. No prior training is necessary. Classes may be cancelled due to hazardous weather conditions and will be noted here. No registration required.

EVENT DETAILS

WHAT: Storm Spotter Class
WHEN: March 24, 6pm
WHERE: Fairview City Call, 7100 City Center Way, Fairview

About SKYWARN Storm Spotter Class

To obtain critical weather information, the National Weather Service (NWS) established SKYWARN® with partner organizations. SKYWARN® is a volunteer program with between 350,000 and 400,000 trained severe weather spotters. These volunteers help keep their local communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service.

Although SKYWARN® spotters provide essential information for all types of weather hazards, the focus is reporting on severe local thunderstorms. In an average year, the United States experiences more than 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 5,000 floods and more than 1,000 tornadoes.

Since the program started in the 1970s, the information provided by SKYWARN® spotters, coupled with Doppler radar technology, improved satellite and other data, has enabled NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings for tornadoes, severe thunderstorms and flash floods. SKYWARN® storm spotters form the nation’s first line of defense against severe weather. There can be no finer reward than to know that your efforts have given your family and neighbors the precious gift of time–minutes that can help save lives.

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Andrea has always loved the written word. She holds a B.A. in Journalism and a Masters in Creative Writing, both from Belmont University. Both sides of her family have lived in Williamson County for generations, so writing for Williamson Source is the perfect fit. She loves to hear stories of what Williamson County was like when her parents and grandparents were young and to write about this ever evolving county is truly special for her.