save stephens valley stop rochford proposed development

Today, Sat Feb 27th and Sun, Feb 28th, concerned citizens are holding a rally to stop the proposed Stephens Valley concept plan under review by Williamson County officials. The proposed Rochford Development is to be located at Sneed Rd and Pasquo Rd, off Hwy 100 (map below).

The subdvision is expected to include over 1,400 custom homes, townhomes, offices and retail lots on 850 acres in Davidson and Williamson counties. Davidson County plans were approved March 2015. But those plans depend on Williamson County approving 871 residential lots on 726 acres in the viewsheds of the Natchez Trace Parkway. This weekend’s rally will take place at the corner of Sneed Road and Temple Hills Road in Franklin.

The Citizens of Old Natchez Trace are organizing this event. Here are some key issues they see if the development goes on as planned:

“High pressure density will cause a permanent traffic tsunami on Sneed, Pasquo, Hwy 100, Temple, Old Natchez Trace, Vaughn, Hillsboro and Old Hillsboro Roads and Del Rio.

The Old Natchez Trace was built in 1801 by United States soldiers and has 8 National Historic Register sites along its 4 miles and 2 more National Historic Register sites are on Del Rio Pike. These scenic, historic, culturally significant and environmentally sensitive treasures will be decimated by this density.

Flooding issues will increase as the imperious surfaces (concrete/asphalt) cover the valley and storm water floods out into existing subdivisions…some damaged severely in the Flood of 2010,” states a press release.

Visit www.savestephensvalley.com for more information.

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Andrea Hinds

Andrea has always loved the written word. She holds a B.A. in Journalism and a Masters in Creative Writing, both from Belmont University. Both sides of her family have lived in Williamson County for generations, so writing for Williamson Source is the perfect fit. She loves to hear stories of what Williamson County was like when her parents and grandparents were young and to write about this ever evolving county is truly special for her.